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The U.S. has committed to continuing to support Kenya in strengthening naval surveillance, countering violent extremism, and fighting terrorism.

Under State Secretary for Political Affairs David Hale, who is in the nation, terrorists said Tuesday will not succeed in causing divisions between Kenyans and the two nations.

ADVERTISEMENT He spoke shortly after laying a wreath at the Nairobi Memorial Park on August 7, a day to commemorate the U.S. Embassy’s 21st bombing in 1998, which killed 213 people. In Dar es Salam, Tanzania, 11 others were murdered where a US embassy was also targeted.

“We will retain our powerful strategic alliance with Kenya to combat Al-Shabaab’s threat of terrorism and any other danger of destabilizing peace here in Kenya,” he said to reporters in a short brief.

Most of those murdered during the concurrent assaults were local, although the primary target of the terrorist was U.S. nationals.

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U.S. investigations ultimately reduced to 18 suspects, including their leader Osama Bin Laden, who was murdered on May 2, 2011.

US forces were involved in launching airstrikes in Somalia where Kenyan forces are fighting Al Shabaab militants under the umbrella of AMISOM.

“Their immediate aim was to murder and ruin, but they had a larger agenda, dividing Kenya and America, undermining our friendship and values, liberty, justice and peace,” Hale said.

“They then failed, just as today terrorists are still failing in their goals. They have not separated America and Kenya and will not separate them, “he stressed.

Although the militants were widely weakened, they initiated pockets of attacks inside and outside Somalia, with Kenya paying the highest cost partially because of a porous boundary between the two nations.

Around 21 years after the lethal attack, terrorists targeted the high-end installations in Kenya, including the institution.

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